Translation quality: what is it?

Posted: 11/13/2012 in Language, Web, Web writing
Tags: , , , , ,

Try to ask this question to several stakeholders and you would be surprised about how many different answers you will get.

Some may say that quality is measured by the user experience and that a quality localized product is one that functions the same way as the English version.

Others may say that a quality translation is one that maintains brand consistency.

Or that a quality translation is one that is factually accurate, readable and (hear hear) not localized (preserves the source culture nuances).

I find all the above answers valid.

However, in June 2006 a new translation quality assurance standard was published by ASTM International and unfortunately it’s still relatively unknown: ASTM F2575.

The ASTM translation standard (F2575) defines translation quality as:

The degree to which the characteristics of a translation fulfill the requirements of the agreed upon specifications

This definition implies two stages: Agreeing upon project-specific specifications and applying those specifications. Sounds too easy, doesn’t it? But it actually works! This approach can be applied to every translation project.

How? Well, translation projects usually consist of three phases:

Pre-Production, Production and Post-Production (aka Post Mortem).

It’s in the Pre-production phase when you should discuss and agree upon the specifications. In the Production phase, these specification should be applied. Finally, in the Post-Production phase, you should carry out the project analysis to verify the fulfillments of the agreed upon specifications.

If all translation projects followed this simple approach, all the different stakeholders would be much happier at the end of the project!

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Comments
  1. In other words, tell your translator what you hope to achieve, what your preferences are, who your target readers are, and what values you are trying to communicate – before translation actually starts.

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